Western Short Stories
Darrel Sparkman
Ranch Romance

Darrel Sparkman

Western short stories Bio. of Darrel Sparkman

Darrel Sparkman resides in Southwest Missouri with his wife.  Their three children and eleven grandchildren live nearby.  His hobbies include gardening, golfing, and writing.  In the past, Darrel served four years in the United States Navy, including seven months in Viet Nam as a combat search & rescue helicopter crewman.  He also served nineteen years as a volunteer Emergency Medical Technician, worked as a professional photographer, computer repair tech, and along with his wife Sue, owned and operated a commercial greenhouse and flower shop.  Darrel is currently retired and self-employed.  He finally has that job that wakes you up every day with a smile

     I never studied much. School wasn’t a big interest for me. In retrospect, I wish I had.  But, what I did was read. Didn’t have much of a childhood, so I read to escape.  Four to five books a week—from middle school into adulthood.  You name it—I read it.  

     Changing schools over twenty times from kindergarten to twelfth grade gave me insight into people and circumstances—and the value of standing your ground.  I loved science fiction, but when the genre morphed to dragons and zombies, I dropped out.  
     Being raised in rural America bent me toward adventure novels and westerns, and I’ve been writing since I was young.  Reading an adventure novel and wanting to get on to the next one gave me the style in my writing of picking a week or so in the protagonist’s life and riding hell-bent from problem to solution.  My heroes are prone to suddenness of action and intent.
​     Writing can exorcise your demons, give you the pleasure of a story well told, and drive you to distraction.  But it is always a ride worth taking.

Find out more about Darrel with the links below>>

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Rescue Trail ©

Darrel Sparkman

Marshal Jake Rawlings tied his horse in front of a weathered building with Saloon painted on the door by a shaky handed artist. The red lettering looked fresh and had soaked into the dry wood before the paint ran to far. The saloon was one of three places left standing in a shanty town Southwest of Joplin, Missouri. The surrounding area was littered with clothing and detriment left behind by fleeing residents. Most of the city of tents and lean-to shacks had disappeared when a twister came through a few days before. It wasn’t clear where all the pieces landed. They could be in Missouri, Kansas, or down in Indian Territory for all he knew. Read the full story HERE>>


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